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  • Amelia Gillis, LMHC

Quarantine: What now?

What you can do while working from home

A message from NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Health)


• To help overcome uncertainty, normality and routine that mirrors life’s daily patterns and practices can be helpful. If working from home, we encourage you to create a structured, dedicated work environment and build in self-care as well as daily benchmarks of achievement.

• Structure and routine may be helpful for people with mental health vulnerabilities, especially during times of uncertainty. We encourage you to maintain a regular routine with the work hours that are usually worked, including keeping up with morning rituals. Dressing in regular work attire and taking regular breaks, including lunch time, may also be helpful.


• Research tells us that seven percent of communication is accomplished through our words, including email. 38 percent is voice and a staggering 55 percent is body language and visual. For people with mental health vulnerabilities, and even for those with extroverted personalities, the lack of face time can be challenging. Using technology to simulate this can offer a solution to bridging this gap. Be mindful of opportunities to integrate video into your conversations with colleagues. Consider using the video function on Skype or Teams for internal and external meetings.



What you can do to get support

Also, there are numerous online support communities and emotional support hotlines to help you if you are quarantined: Building Resilience o Visit the CDC’s page on Stigma and Resilience that discusses COVID-19’s impact on mental health, and how we can reject stigma and build resilience during this time.


Finding Phone Support

A warmline is a confidential, non-crisis emotional support telephone hotline staffed by peer volunteers who are in recovery. Callers will find an empathetic listener to talk through their feelings. To find a warmline that serves your area, visit the NAMI HelpLine Warmline Directory


Finding Online Support Communities

o NAMI hosts online communities where people exchange support and encouragement. These Discussion Groups can easily be joined by visiting www.nami.org.


7 Cups: www.7cups.com

 Free online text chat with a trained listener for emotional support and counseling. Also offers fee- for-service online therapy with a licensed mental health professional. Service/website also offered in Spanish.


Emotions Anonymous: www.emotionsanonymous.org

 An international fellowship of people who desire to have a better sense of emotional well-being. EA members have in person and online weekly meetings available in more than 30 countries with 600 active groups worldwide. The EA is nonprofessional and can be a complement to therapy.


Support Group Central: www.supportgroupscentral.com

 Offers virtual support groups on numerous mental health conditions - free or low-cost. Website also offered in Spanish. NAMI HelpLine Monday-Friday, 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., EST (800) 950-6264


TheTribe Wellness Community: www.support.therapytribe.com

 Free, online peer support groups offering members facing mental health challenges and/or difficult family dynamics a safe place to connect. Support groups include Addiction, Anxiety, Depression, HIV/AIDS, LGBT, Marriage/Family, OCD and Teens.


SupportGroups.com: https://online.supportgroups.com/

 Website featuring 200+ online support groups.


For Like Minds: www.forlikeminds.com

 Online mental health support network that allows for individuals to connect with others who are living with or supporting someone with mental health conditions, substance use disorders, and stressful life events.


18percent: www.18percent.org

 Offers a free, peer-to-peer online support community for those struggling with a wide range of mental health issues.


Psych Central: www.psychcentral.com

 Offers online mental health resources, quizzes, news, an “Ask the Therapist” function, and online support communities.